8 Tips for Freezing Food with a Vacuum Sealer


8 Tips for Freezing Food with a Vacuum Sealer | thegoodstuff

A vacuum sealer can save you money if you put it to good use. Let it sit on your kitchen counter like a paperweight and it won’t get you far, but if you start using it regularly it will extend the life of your food, meaning you can shop and cook in bulk. That can save some major time and money, like using a Victoria’s Secret or Old Navy promo code, and who doesn’t love that?

We’ve put together eight tips for freezing food with a vacuum sealer that will help you save your food — and money

1. How to pre-freeze

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What happens when you put fresh berries in a freezer bag and suck the air out? You get squashed fruit. Spread out and pre-freeze items like fruits, veggies, and meatballs on cookie sheets. Pre-freeze saucy items like soups and pastas in plastic containers. Pack food down with a spoon or spatula before you pre-freeze to get rid of any air bubbles. Once the blocks of food are frozen, pop them out and vacuum seal them. Need a vacuum sealer? Check out deals at The Home Depot.

2. When to freeze cooked versus uncooked

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Some dishes like soups and sauces reheat really well. For others, you may want to assemble and vacuum seal without cooking. Whenever I see a great price on a 3-pound package of ground turkey, I’ll mix and pre-form three batches of raw meatballs. When meatballs are on the menu, the hard work is done but you still get a freshly-cooked meal with minimum effort.

3. Always label packages

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You think you’ll remember the third package from the back is the tomato sauce you made in July. Then, six months later when you pour it over pasta, you realize you’ve just doused your noodles in chili. Always write the name of the dish and the date it was made. A permanent marker is recommended, but you could also use a label maker from Walgreens.

4. Not just for the freezer

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Vacuum sealing can also stretch the shelf life of food in your refrigerator and pantry. Did you buy a big block of cheddar? Vacuum seal half until you get through the first chunk. Vacuum sealing can also be a good way to extend the life of dry goods — just make sure you have a barrier between the vacuum sealer and any powder. For example, keep flour in its original packaging and vacuum seal the whole package.

5. Double recipes, freeze the extra

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From here on out, double any dish you know will freeze well. Immediately vacuum seal the extra so you’re preserving the dish at its peak. Disposable foil pans are great for storing dishes like enchiladas. Assemble two trays of enchiladas, cook one for dinner tonight and vacuum seal the other. The next time you want to have some, defrost and heat them up in the oven.

6. Buy the bags

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Source: FoodSaver® Blog

There’s a reason you have to buy special bags for your vacuum sealer machine. These bags are designed just for your vacuum sealer and there’s a lot more to them than meets the eye. Use the bag to keep air and moisture completely out and get a tight seal. Check out JCPenny for a wide selection of vacuum bags.

7. Portion it out properly

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Most bags can be cleaned and reused (with the exception of bags used on raw meats or anything else that could have bacteria remnants). However, it makes things a lot easier when you freeze a meal’s worth per bag. Buy the three-pound ground beef package, then divvy it up into three one-pound portions and freeze accordingly.

8. Become your own butcher

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You probably stand to net the most savings when you utilize your vacuum sealer on meat. Now that you have a vacuum sealer, you can buy the bulk package of steaks at the warehouse store (which costs less per pound) and individually seal and freeze steaks. Trim them down if necessary with cutlery from stores like Harbor Freight.


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